Home » News & Blogs » More than 5,000 tons of space dust fall to Earth each year
Bookmark and Share
EarthSky Blog

More than 5,000 tons of space dust fall to Earth each year

24 Apr 2021, 18:00 UTC
More than 5,000 tons of space dust fall to Earth each year
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

View at EarthSky Community Photos | Chirag Bachani in Marathan, Texas, captured this photo of the Geminid meteor showe on December 14, 2020. He wrote: “The Geminid meteor shower produced a spectacular show with over 100 meteors per hour at the peak around 2 am local time on December 14th. This image displays over 40 meteors captured throughout the night from a Bortle Class 1 dark sky in Marathon, Texas. Many of the meteors lasted over 2 seconds and were typically green and blue.” Thank you, Chirag!
According to a new paper, over 5,000 tons of space dust fall on Earth every year. The study, published April 15, 2021, in the peer-reviewed journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, is the result of a 20-year collection of extraterrestrial particles performed near the Concordia Research Station in Antarctica by an international team of researchers.
Dust shed from comets and asteroids constantly rains down on our planet. When these tiny bits of dust and rock pass through our atmosphere, they usually burn up, and the short-lived trail of light made by the burning debris is called a meteor.
If the meteor does not burn up completely, the remaining portion hits the Earth and ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod