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Dust in Time – Supernovae May Not Destroy Dust As Quickly As We Think

24 Mar 2021, 14:00 UTC
Dust in Time – Supernovae May Not Destroy Dust As Quickly As We Think
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Title: Revisiting the dust destruction efficiency of supernovaeAuthors: F. D. Priestley, H. Chawner, M. Matsuura, I. De Looze, M. J. Barlow, H. L. GomezFirst Author’s Institution: School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queen’s Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, UKStatus: Published in MNRAS [open access]
In Dust We TrustWhat could be more exciting than dust? Maybe dust in space?! Okay, perhaps even space dust isn’t the most enthralling subject upon first glance, but dust is arguably the most underappreciated topic in astronomy. Measurements of dust can tell us about magnetic fields, temperatures, and even the 3D morphology of structures in our galaxy! An image of dust emission from the Andromeda galaxy is shown in Figure 1. Over the next decade, dust will play a crucial role in helping us understand the 3D structure of gas in our galaxy for the first time ever (for example, check out the recent discovery of the Radcliffe Wave). Dust also tells us a whole lot about the chemistry that operates during star and planet creation and is key to studying how complex molecules, like those that make up you and me, were formed. In today’s study, though, the author’s examine how this dust ...

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