Home » News & Blogs » Smashing Neutrons: On the Origin of Extreme r-Process Enhanced Stars
Bookmark and Share
AAS Nova

Smashing Neutrons: On the Origin of Extreme r-Process Enhanced Stars

9 Mar 2021, 17:00 UTC
Smashing Neutrons: On the Origin of Extreme r-Process Enhanced Stars
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Editor’s note: Astrobites is a graduate-student-run organization that digests astrophysical literature for undergraduate students. As part of the partnership between the AAS and astrobites, we occasionally repost astrobites content here at AAS Nova. We hope you enjoy this post from astrobites; the original can be viewed at astrobites.org.
Title: Extreme r-process enhanced stars at high metallicity in Fornax
Authors: M. Reichert, C. J. Hansen, A. Arcones
First Author’s Institution: Technical University of Darmstadt and Helmholtz International Center for FAIR, Germany
Status: Submitted to ApJ
What Are Metals?
Periodic table showing the origin of each chemical element. Those produced by the r-process are shaded orange and attributed to supernovae in this image; though supernovae are one proposed source of r-process elements, an alternative source is the merger of two neutron stars. [Cmglee]Astronomers, much to the chagrin of chemists, refer to elements heavier than hydrogen or helium as “metals.” In fact, the most abundant “metals” in the universe, like oxygen and carbon, are not metals at all by the chemical definition. Nonetheless, today’s bite focuses on actual heavy metals. While many elements are forged either in the end stages of a massive star’s life in a core-collapse supernova or in the death ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod