Home » News & Blogs » 10/23/2020 – Ephemeris – What is a Near Rectilinear Halo Orbit?
Bookmark and Share
Bob Moler's Ephemeris Blog

10/23/2020 – Ephemeris – What is a Near Rectilinear Halo Orbit?

23 Oct 2020, 04:01 UTC
10/23/2020 – Ephemeris – What is a Near Rectilinear Halo Orbit?
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

This is Ephemeris for Friday, October 23rd. Today the Sun will be up for 10 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 6:44, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:10. The Moon, at first quarter today, will set at 12:46 tomorrow morning.
When the astronauts of the Artemis program head for a landing on the Moon is as little as four years from now they will meet their lunar landing craft or Lunar Gateway space station with landing craft docked to it before they descend to the Moon. The orbit of the gateway and/or lander is an odd one. It’s called a near rectilinear halo orbit. And uses the motion and gravitational interaction of the Moon and Earth to create an orbit of the Moon which is nearly face-on to the Earth. The vehicles will never pass behind the Moon. The orbit will pass 1,900 miles (3,000 km) above the Moon’s north pole and out to 43,000 miles (70,000 km) above the south pole. It’s called a halo orbit, because as seen from the Earth it appears to trace a halo around the Moon.
The event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod