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H0w Low Can You Go? Limiting Early Dark Energy with Large-scale Structure

21 Aug 2020, 19:34 UTC
H0w Low Can You Go? Limiting Early Dark Energy with Large-scale Structure
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Title: Constraining Early Dark Energy with Large Scale StructureAuthors: Mikhail M. Ivanov, Evan McDonough, J. Colin Hill, Marko Simonović, Michael W. Toomey, Stephon Alexander, and Matias ZaldarriagaFirst Author’s Institution: Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USAStatus: Submitted to arXivThe Hubble constant (H0) has quickly become a star in the world of forced astronomical acronyms (H0LiCOW, SH0ES), and for good reason. Measuring H0 quantifies the expansion of the universe, and is how cosmologists converged on the idea that we live in a universe that is accelerating in its expansion due to dark energy. Discrepant measurements of H0, which has been dubbed the Hubble tension, has been a big deal lately, not only in the cosmological community, but also on this site! Don’t take my word for it – Each word links a different bite!There is a lot of great material in those bites, so we’ll just settle for the one-sentence version of the Hubble tension here. Measurements of H0 at late times using type Ia supernovae (74 km/s/Mpc by the SH0ES team) and at early times using the Cosmic Microwave Background (67 km/s/Mpc by the Planck team) are different enough from ...

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