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Through Collision Comes Light: Powering Stellar Explosions Through Shock Cooling Emission

7 Aug 2020, 13:00 UTC
Through Collision Comes Light: Powering Stellar Explosions Through Shock Cooling Emission
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Title: Shock Cooling Emission from Extended Material Revisited Authors: Anthony Piro, Annastasia Haynie, Yuhan YaoFirst author’s institution: The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science Journal: Submitted to the Astrophysical Journal. Open access on arXiv. Disclaimer: The author would first like to publicly state that Black lives and Black Trans lives matter. Secondly, the author condemns all police brutality against people of color. Lastly, the author recognizes that the writing of this article was performed on the stolen land of indigenous people.

Bright, but not bright enough…Supernovae are among the most turbulent, luminous explosions in the known universe. These brilliant displays of stellar demise are produced from an amalgam of scenarios such as the merging of compact stars or the violent collapse of a star much more massive than our own Sun. A key facet in understanding the origins of different supernovae comes from their light curve evolution, the change in luminosity over time. However, not all supernova light curves can be explained by identical physics and thus astronomers are always on the lookout for new models to explain peculiar behavior. The explosion of any star will naturally provide us with a reservoir of energy that is released over the ...

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