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Stellar Snacks or: How to Grow a Massive Black Hole through TDEs

7 Jul 2020, 10:02 UTC
Stellar Snacks or: How to Grow a Massive Black Hole through TDEs
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Title: Tidal disruption events in the first billion years of a galaxyAuthors: Hugo Pfister, Jane Dai, Marta Volonteri, Katie Auchettl, Maxime Trebitsch, Enrico Ramirez-RuizFirst Author’s Institution: DARK, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark and Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, ChinaStatus: Submitted to the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, open access on arXiv
One Gyr in the Life of a Massive Black HoleMassive black holes (MBHs) are known to live in the centers of most galaxies, including Sagittarius A* in our own Milky Way. These MBHs are intimately linked to the evolution and growth of their host galaxies (and vice versa), as evidenced by the M- relationship. However, the details of how MBHs are born and quickly grow to such gargantuan masses are still largely unknown.There are two main channels for MBHs to grow throughout cosmic time, accretion and mergers. While it is thought that the majority of black hole growth is through accretion of gas, infalling gas is subject to heating processes called feedback. Considering this, gas accretion alone cannot fully explain the existence of extremely massive (more than a billion solar mass) black holes within ...

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