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You’ve Got a Friend in Me: A Hot Jupiter with a Unique Companion

7 Apr 2020, 16:00 UTC
You’ve Got a Friend in Me: A Hot Jupiter with a Unique Companion
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Editor’s note: Astrobites is a graduate-student-run organization that digests astrophysical literature for undergraduate students. As part of the partnership between the AAS and astrobites, we occasionally repost astrobites content here at AAS Nova. We hope you enjoy this post from astrobites; the original can be viewed at astrobites.org.
Title: TESS spots a hot Jupiter with an inner-transiting Neptune
Authors: Chelsea X. Huang, et al.
First Author’s Institution: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Status: Published in ApJL
For centuries, humankind has wondered if other planets exist outside of our own solar system, or if we are in fact unique. The first recorded attempts to observe other planets date to around the 19th century — although exoplanets have been speculated since the 16th century — but we did not have the technology to make the detailed measurements required to detect planets around other stars until the last few decades. The first detected exoplanet, 51 Pegasi b, was discovered in 1995, and since then we have learned that exoplanets are actually more of the rule than the exception. Some of the most common exoplanets that we are able to detect are called hot Jupiters — large gas giants like our Jupiter, but so close ...

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