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AMT4OceanSatFlux: The Azores, in the mixer and the Big Blue

1 Nov 2019, 11:59 UTC
AMT4OceanSatFlux: The Azores, in the mixer and the Big Blue
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In his next post, Gavin Tilstone from the Plymouth Marine Laboratory, describes the next leg of the voyage through the Atlantic for the AMT4OceanSatFlux project. Supported by ESA, the project the measures the flux of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the ocean using a state-of-the-art eddy covariance technique along the length of the Atlantic Ocean. These measurements will be used to validate a range of satellite products to gain regional and global estimates of gas exchange between the atmosphere and ocean.
From the 19 October 2019, we continued to steam southwest navigating through waters deeper than 4500 m. The journey took us parallel to the Bay of Biscay where the waters are 16°C and the surface greenness from phytoplankton is patchy and stringy. Before the mid- day sampling station, the blow from a fin whale was sighted off the starboard aft. As we continued south, the maximum phytoplankton Chlorophyll-a concentration deepened from 55 to 80 meters. This is akin to trekking into a large canyon or going deeper into the abyss.
After four days we were in sight of the Azores; strange to have land in view again. In the darkness of 05:00 the silhouette of Sao Miguel rose ...

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