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Deciphering Spitzer’s Legacy: Signs of Dead Galaxies at Cosmic Dawn

15 Feb 2020, 10:49 UTC
Deciphering Spitzer’s Legacy: Signs of Dead Galaxies at Cosmic Dawn
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Title: Interpreting the Spitzer/IRAC Colours of 7<z<9 Galaxies: Distinguishing Between Line Emission and Starlight Using ALMAAuthors: Guido Roberts-Borsani, Richard S. Ellis, and Nicolas LaporteFirst Author’s Institution: University of California, Los AngelesStatus: Submitted to MNRAS, open access on ArXiv
Farewell, Spitzer…After a prodigious career, the Spitzer Space Telescope was shut off on 30th January 2020.Originally named the Space Infrared Facility when it was launched in 2003, Spitzer peered out into the dark universe of dust and gas to reveal entirely new phenomena that are inaccessible from under the Earth’s infrared-absorbing atmosphere. Equipped with three science instruments, the Infrared Camera (IRAC), Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), and Multiband Imager (MIPS), Spitzer provided key clues to the nature of star-formation, the formation of exoplanets, and the dusty structures within the galaxies, among others.Following the loss of its remaining liquid helium coolant in 2009, Spitzer transitioned into its post-cryogenic mission. Despite operating with only two channels (i.e. bandpasses) of its IRAC infrared camera, Spitzer continued to live up to its reputation by discovering a planet 13,000 light-years away as well as the most distant galaxy to date, seen as it was 13.4 billion years ago.
The IRAC excessToday’s astrobite focuses on a lasting mystery precipitated by ...

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