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Pulling on Pulsars: Searching for Black Holes in Globular Clusters with Pulsars

24 Jan 2020, 14:27 UTC
Pulling on Pulsars: Searching for Black Holes in Globular Clusters with Pulsars
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Title: Intermediate mass black holes in globular clusters: effects on jerks and jounces of millisecond pulsarsAuthors: Federico Abbate, Mario Spera, Monica ColpiFirst Author’s Institution: Universit`a degli Studi Milano – Bicocca, Milano, ItalyStatus: Published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, open access on arXivFigure 1: Hubble image of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104). Credits: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team (STScI / AURA)Globular clusters, dense groups of hundreds of thousands of stars bound together by their own gravity, are home to some of the most exotic objects in the universe. Among these are pulsars, highly magnetized neutron stars that beam radio emission out as they rotate. Some pulsars complete a full rotation in just a few milliseconds, and are aptly called millisecond pulsars. Globular clusters are also known to host black holes, some of the most elusive astronomical bodies known.Just four years ago, observations with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected black holes with masses of 7 to 80 times the mass of the sun (stellar mass black holes) for the first time. This past year, the Event Horizon Telescope imaged a supermassive black hole, which have masses of a million to a billion times that of ...

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