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Where Will the Next-Generation Very Large Array Take Us? To Our Cosmic Origins

7 Jan 2019, 21:05 UTC
Where Will the Next-Generation Very Large Array Take Us? To Our Cosmic Origins
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Dr. Kristina Nyland was a postdoctoral research associate at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory from 2015 to 2018. She has over a decade of experience working with data from radio telescopes around the world and is excited about the possibility of using an instrument like the next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) for her research.
Before the AAS 233 meeting in Seattle, we asked her a few questions about her area of study–active galactic nuclei– and how the ngVLA will change the direction of her fieldwork.
What are AGN’s (and what’s AGN feedback)? And how do you use them to study star and galaxy formation?
Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are galaxies that have very energetic central regions, due to either the presence of a black hole or star formation activity at the core of the galaxy. Galaxies containing supermassive black holes at their center can usually be classified into one of two groups based on whether or not they have what is known as an active galactic nucleus (AGN). A galaxy with an AGN exhibits a much higher than normal luminosity in at least one part of the electromagnetic spectrum. For example, the orange in this image shows Fornax ...

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