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A Uranus-Type Planet in a Binary Stellar System

27 Aug 2014, 10:00 UTC
A Uranus-Type Planet in a Binary Stellar System
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A gravitational microlensing search by R. Poleski (2014) revealed the presence of a Uranus-type planet in orbit around a 0.6 solar mass star. The gravitational microlensing event is designated OGLE-2008-BLG-092, and the newfound planet is estimated to be ~3 times the mass of Uranus and it circles its host star at ~16 AU. For comparison, Uranus orbits the Sun at an average distance of 19 AU. This newfound planet is the first known exoplanet whose mass and orbit is similar to Uranus. The planet was detected when it and its host star fortuitously passed in front of a background star, and the gravitational field of the star-planet system magnified light from the background star.Figure 1: Artist’s impression of a Uranus-type planet.Planets in the Solar System can be classed into 3 groups: small rocky planets (Earth, Venus, etc), gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) and ice-giants (Uranus and Neptune). At present, the leading methods of detecting planets around other stars (i.e. transit and radial velocity methods) have yet to turn up any extrasolar analogues of Uranus and Neptune. Such planets are far from their host stars and have orbital periods that exceed a human lifespan. As a result, both the transit and ...

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