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Why Can We See Stars That Are Billions of Light Years Away?

18 Apr 2014, 18:16 UTC
Why Can We See Stars That Are Billions of Light Years Away?
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Question: I can’t get seem to find a thoughtful yet scientific answer to this question, I was hoping you could help. I hope this doesn’t sound dumb, I don’t mean it to be. When we look at the night sky, we see a blanket of stars. They seem very close together and crowed in the sky. I know some of them may not even still exist, just the light still coming from them over millions of light years away, in some cases. But how is it that we can see stars that appear to be so close together but in fact are at least light years away from one another, with the naked eye from earth, no less? And stars from one side of the night time horizon to the other have to be billions of light years apart, right? How can we see objects so far away with the naked eye? If we use our suns size and scale it to stars we see in the sky, millions of light years away we should not be able to see them at all, right? I just don’t get it! Is there some phenomenon I’m not understanding? – Tim
Answer: For ...

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