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Flaring radio emissions from an ultra-cool star and why bigger isn't always faster

2 May 2012, 09:11 UTC
Flaring radio emissions from an ultra-cool star and why bigger isn't always faster
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Welcome! "Alien Life" tracks the latest discoveries and thoughts in the various elements of the famous Drake Equation. Here's today's news:g Stars - Penn State University astronomers using the world's largest radio telescope, at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, have discovered flaring radio emissions from an ultra-cool star, not much warmer than the planet Jupiter, shattering the previous record for the lowest stellar temperature at which radio waves were detected. See article.g Abodes - Images of lava flows in Mars have revealed spiral patterns that resemble snail shells. The patterns indicate possible interactions between lava and floods of water. See article.g Life - New research in the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology shows why bigger isn't always better when it comes to sprinting speed. See article.Get your SF book manuscript edited Amazon.com Widgets

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