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Rare tellurium discovered in ancient stars and integrating microbiology into climate models

22 Feb 2012, 15:00 UTC
Rare tellurium discovered in ancient stars and integrating microbiology into climate models
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Welcome! "Alien Life" tracks the latest discoveries and thoughts in the various elements of the famous Drake Equation. Here's today's news:g Stars - a team of researchers from institutions including MIT has detected the element tellurium for the first time in three ancient stars. The researchers found traces of this brittle, semiconducting element -- which is very rare on Earth -- in stars that are nearly 12 billion years old. The finding supports the theory that tellurium, along with even heavier elements in the periodic table, likely originated from a very rare type of supernova during a rapid process of nuclear fusion. See article.g Abodes - Researchers have developed a plan for integrating microbiology into the climate models that astrobiologists use to understand Earth's climate and habitability. See article.g Life - Scientists have developed new models that help explain the astonishing durability of the biologically-produced material known as mother of pearl. See article.g Cosmicus - The technology behind Google is now being adapted to analyze the way molecules are shaped and organized. See article.Get your SF book manuscript edited Amazon.com Widgets

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