Home » Press Releases » Distant Giant Planets Form Differently than ‘Failed Stars’
Bookmark and Share
McDonald Observatory

Distant Giant Planets Form Differently than ‘Failed Stars’

10 Feb 2020, 17:15 UTC
Distant Giant Planets Form Differently than ‘Failed Stars’ Brendan Bowler (UT-Austin)

A team of astronomers led by Brendan Bowler of The University of Texas at Austin has probed the formation process of giant exoplanets and brown dwarfs, a class of objects that are more massive than giant planets, but not massive enough to ignite nuclear fusion in their cores to shine like true stars. Using direct imaging with giant ground-based telescopes, they studied the orbits of these faint companions orbiting stars in 27 systems. These data, combined with modeling of the orbits, allowed them to determine that the brown dwarfs in these systems formed like stars, but the gas giants formed like planets. The research is published in the current issue of The Astronomical Journal.

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod