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Return to the Deep: Five sights to get you back in the deep-sky swing

9 Oct 2021, 19:20 UTC
Return to the Deep: Five sights to get you back in the deep-sky swing
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With autumn beckoning, our lengthening nights will thankfully soon be blessed again with twilight-free skies. Provided you’re observing from a site free from major light-pollution, you’ll enjoy getting reacquainted with the multitude of deep-sky delights that are on show now and throughout the autumn.
Here’s five great targets to get you in the mood, whether you’re armed with humble binoculars, a small, medium or large telescope or a sophisticated imaging rig.

Kemble’s Cascade: a great binocular asterism
The night sky can be enjoyed through a humble pair of grab and go 10 x 50 binoculars, which show some of the best sights the deep sky has to offer.
Observing the night sky should be fun. Tracking down and observing asterisms, which are unofficial, chance alignments of physically unrelated stars outside of the recognised constellations, is a great way to show the night sky to youngsters and for seasoned deep-sky observers to take a break from straining their eyes for meagre photons.
One of the best asterisms for binocular observers is Kemble’s Cascade, which is located in the constellation of Camelopardalis, the giraffe. The Cascade is a virtually straight line of 17 white, seventh- and eighth-magnitude stars running north-west ...

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