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Mars Express Blog

Skimming Phobos

13 Jan 2016, 15:47 UTC
Skimming Phobos
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Inputs from today’s blog post were provided by Thomas Duxbury, an interdisciplinary scientist on MEX for the Mars moons and Mars geodesy/cartography (and also a co-investigator on the HRSC scene team), Dmitri Titov, ESA’s Mars Express project scientist, and Simon Wood, from the MEX mission operations team at ESOC, ESA’s European Space Operations Centre, Darmstadt, Germany.
On Thursday, 14 January, ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft will make an unusually close flyby of the largest Martian moon, Phobos, passing the surface at just 53 km at closet approach at 16:00:21 UTC (17:00 CET) on orbit 15260.
The event will mark the spacecraft’s closest flyby of the moon in 2016, and, as a point of comparison, most of the other almost-60 Phobos flybys this year will occur between several hundred up to almost 2000 km. So it’s a real skimmer!
Predicted view from MEX for the 14 Jan 2016 Phobos flyby. The centre image is the predicted perspective view of Phobos at closest approach. This shows the view along Phobos’ shorter axes and it appears smaller than the other two images, which show the view along Phobos’ longest axis. Credit: T. Duxbury
The flyby will enable Mars Express instruments, especially the HRSC – ...

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