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A new exoplanet-hunting instrument begins reaping the rewards

30 Aug 2019, 08:43 UTC
A new exoplanet-hunting instrument begins reaping the rewards
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Artist’s conception of the Kepler-13AB binary star system. The two stars (A and B) are large, massive bluish stars (centre) with the transiting “hot Jupiter” (Kepler-13b) in the foreground (left corner). Star B and its low mass red dwarf companion star are seen in the background to the right. Image credit: Gemini Observatory/NSF/AURA/Artwork by Joy Pollard
In an unprecedented feat, an American research team discovered hidden secrets of an elusive exoplanet using a powerful new instrument at the eight-metre (26-foot) Gemini North telescope on Maunakea in Hawai‘i. The findings not only classify a Jupiter-sized exoplanet in a close binary star system, but also conclusively demonstrate, for the first time, which star the planet orbits.
The breakthrough occurred when Steve B. Howell of the NASA Ames Research Center and his team used a high-resolution imaging instrument of their design – named ‘Alopeke (a contemporary Hawaiian word for Fox). The team observed exoplanet Kepler-13b as it passed in front of (transited) one of the stars in the Kepler-13AB binary star system some 2,000 light years distant. Prior to this attempt, the true nature of the exoplanet was a mystery.
“There was confusion over Kepler-13b: was it a low-mass star or a hot ...

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