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Space Telescope Sees a Rocky Exoplanet’s Surface. And It’s Horrible

21 Aug 2019, 03:26 UTC
Space Telescope Sees a Rocky Exoplanet’s Surface. And It’s Horrible
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It’s both too hot and too cold, has no atmosphere, and is no place to take a vacation—but there is an upside.

LHS 3844b is covered in dark lava rock and doesn’t have an atmosphere. It’s difficult to see any upside [NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (IPAC)]

It’s hard to say anything positive about the exoplanet LHS 3844b. It’s a wretched place; an alien world that orbits its tiny star in less than half a day. As it’s so close to its red dwarf star, it’s tidally-locked—when one side of the planet is always in baking daylight, the other side is in a perpetual frozen night. Oh, and it doesn’t even have an atmosphere.

Why the heck am I even writing about this unfortunate celestial object?

Well, it might not be our idea of an interstellar getaway, but it is remarkable for two profound reasons: It’s a rare look at the surface conditions of a rocky exoplanet orbiting a distant star, and the very fact that astronomers are confident it doesn’t have an atmosphere is a really big deal.

World of Extremes

Discovered in 2018, LHS 3844b is located nearly 49 light-years away. It has a radius 30 percent larger than Earth ...

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