Home » News & Blogs » International Space Station Shines A Light On Mid-Winter Nights
Bookmark and Share
Astro Bob

International Space Station Shines A Light On Mid-Winter Nights

25 Jan 2019, 19:29 UTC
International Space Station Shines A Light On Mid-Winter Nights
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

The International Space Station cuts a path between Orion and the Hyades cluster last night over Duluth, Minn. At left the station fades and then disappears as it enters Earth’s shadow. For the next couple weeks, the ISS will be making one or two passes a night over many locations. Details: 20mm lens, ISO 400 with about a one-minute time exposure. Bob King
We’ve now gained 40 minutes of evening daylight and 10 minutes in the morning. Can you tell? I noticed the shift yesterday when I was driving home in sunset-pink air around 5 o’clock. Back in mid-December, the sun bid farewell at 4:21 p.m. with twilight well underway by 5. I’m no fan of summer’s long days but a little extra daylight doesn’t hurt. Sure takes the edge off the current cold snap. Cold may be uncomfortable, but polar air masses often bring clear skies. And if you dress warmly 15 minutes of starry skies a night may be all you need to avoid that stuck-inside feeling.
This is how our planet looks from 250 miles up viewing from the ISS cupola. Now that’s a window seat! NASA
I’ve got an enticement for you. The International Space Station ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod