Home » News & Blogs » We Just Measured All The Starlight In The Universe, And It Spells Doom For Our Future
Bookmark and Share
Starts With a Bang!

We Just Measured All The Starlight In The Universe, And It Spells Doom For Our Future

6 Dec 2018, 19:01 UTC
We Just Measured All The Starlight In The Universe, And It Spells Doom For Our Future
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

The most distant galaxies ever observed in the Universe are smaller, full of young stars, and have high star-formation rates, relative to the Milky Way. So you’d expect them to be more compact, chaotic, and ellipsoidal just based on straightforward astrophysics. It’s the gamma-ray sky, however, that lets us understand the full suite of our Universe’s star formation history. (NASA, ESA, J. JEE (UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS), J. HUGHES (RUTGERS UNIVERSITY), F. MENANTEAU (RUTGERS UNIVERSITY AND UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA-CHAMPAIGN), C. SIFON (LEIDEN OBSERVATORY), R. MANDELBUM (CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY), L. BARRIENTOS (UNIVERSIDAD CATOLICA DE CHILE), AND K. NG (UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS))The Universe has been making stars for nearly the entire 13.8 billion years of its history. Here’s what we know.It’s been 13.8 billion years since the hot Big Bang, and the Universe has come a long way in that time. Our cosmic vision extends for some 46.1 billion light-years in all directions, revealing some 2 trillion galaxies in the process. Each galaxy, on average, contains hundreds of billions of stars, while each star is made of perhaps some 10⁵⁷ atoms. There’s a lot that’s happened in our Universe, but most of it — including the formation of most stars ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod