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Jupiter’s Great Red Spot got its first-ever close up last week

17 Jul 2017, 14:44 UTC
Jupiter’s Great Red Spot got its first-ever close up last week
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The Great Red Spot on Jupiter, as imaged from Voyager 1 in 1979. This was the closest view of the Great Red Spot ever obtained, but the Juno spacecraft will get approximately 20 times closer than Voyager 1 ever did. Image credit: NASA / Voyager 1.Nothing has ever come closer than NASA’s Voyager 1, nearly 40 years ago. Last week, all that changed.“Juno will peer hundreds of miles downward into the atmosphere with its microwave radiometer, which passively senses heat coming from within the planet. This capability will enable Juno to reveal the deep structure of the Great Red Spot, along with other prominent Jovian features, such as the colorful cloud bands.” -Tricia TalbertJupiter is the Solar System’s largest planet, with the largest continuously-raging storm ever known.At 317 the mass of Earth, Jupiter is the largest and most massive planet in the solar system, and it also boasts the largest storm: the Great Red Spot, as seen here. Image credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Karkoschka (U. Arizona).Jupiter’s Great Red Spot (GRS) was discovered in 1665, raging continuously from at least 1830 until today.At earlier times than the late 1970s, Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was in between the large, dark bands, ...

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