Home » News & Blogs » Massive runaway star near Tarantula Nebula races thru universe at 250,000 mph
Bookmark and Share
Astronomy.FM Skylog: Looking Up!

Massive runaway star near Tarantula Nebula races thru universe at 250,000 mph

12 May 2010, 02:52 UTC
Massive runaway star near Tarantula Nebula races thru universe at 250,000 mph
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

A massive runaway star has been spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope
racing away from the its home stellar nursery after being kicked out by
some of its much heftier stellar siblings. he future outlook for this tough-luck star seemingly doesn't improve:
Paul Crowther of the University of Sheffield, a member of the team who
made the observations of 30 Dor #016, said the wayward star will
continue to streak across space and will eventually end its life in a titanic supernova explosion, likely leaving behind a remnant blackhole.The fugitive already appears to have traveled 375 light-years from its
birthplace: a star cluster called R136 deep in the Tarantula Nebula. Astronomers caught the stellar runaway in Hubble Space Telescope data taken shortly after the last space shuttle servicing mission in May 2009. The team chose the star as a target to help calibrate the newly
installed Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), an instrument designed to
look at the light signatures—or spectra—of very distant, faint objects.For more: Click the post heading "Massive runaway star near Tarantula Nebula races thru universe at 250,000 mph"

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod