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NASA’s Impossible Space Engine, The EMdrive, Passes Peer Review (Synopsis)

2 Sep 2016, 14:01 UTC
NASA’s Impossible Space Engine, The EMdrive, Passes Peer Review (Synopsis)
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

“All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.” -Carl Sagan
For every action, there’s an equal and opposite reaction. While Newton may not be the final word in mechanics anymore since the development of relativity and quantum physics, this law — better known as the conservation of momentum — has held up from the 17th century through the 21st in every interaction ever observed. Unless, that is, the EMdrive is everything it claims to be.
The surface magnetic field of an active EMdrive, during the NASA test. Image credit: NASA Spaceflight forums, via Chris Bergin.
A propulsion-less device that results in thrust would be revolutionary, regardless of its efficiency. The tests done by NASA Eagleworks on this device have allegedly just passed peer review, meaning these results of a positive thrust with no observed exhaust (of an action with no reaction) are about to be published. But does that mean these results are real, and the laws of physics can now be considered broken? Or does passing peer review mean something else?
Inventor Roger Shawyer with ...

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