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The Double Red Giant With Odd Oscillations

20 Jan 2016, 01:39 UTC
The Double Red Giant With Odd Oscillations
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My latest paper was accepted for publication on December 31, announced on the astro-ph preprint arXiv on January 5, and will appear soon in The Astrophysical Journal [UPDATE Feb 11! Rawls et al. 2016, ApJ, 818, 108]. It was written online using Authorea. I also wrote several programs in python to analyze data for this paper.
Picture two nearly-identical stars orbiting each other. Something like this:
An approximation of the double red giant binary KIC 9246715, created using an eclipsing binary simulator. In reality, the two stars are separated by more than 200 times our Sun’s radius, but this simulator maxes out at 60. One orbit takes 170 days rather than the 26 illustrated here. The brightness, or flux, dips when one star passes in front of the other. The eclipses are not evenly spaced in time because the orbit is eccentric.
Even though they usually appear as a single dot of light, binary stars are one of the best tools astronomers have to measure stellar properties. Thanks to the math behind gravity, we can weigh pairs of stars using the relationship between how long an orbit takes and how far apart the things are doing the orbiting. Weighing stars ...

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