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Rocketology: NASA’s Space Launch System

Time Flies: Next-Generation Rocket Is the Work of Generations

25 Mar 2016, 15:28 UTC
Time Flies: Next-Generation Rocket Is the Work of Generations
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

This week’s Rocketology post is by the newest member of the SLS communications team, Beverly Perry.
When NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) first flies, it will slice through Earth’s atmosphere, unshackling itself from gravity, and soar toward the heavens in an amazing display of shock and awe. To meet the engineering challenges such an incredible endeavor presents, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center draws upon a vast and diverse array of engineering talent, expertise and enthusiasm that spans multiple disciplines and, in some cases, a generation. Or two.
Kathryn Crowe is a twenty-something aerospace engineer who tweets from her smartphone and calls herself a “purveyor of the future.” Hugh Brady, on the other hand, began his career at Marshall during the days of punch cards and gargantuan room-sized IBM mainframes with an entire 16 kilobytes (!) of memory.
While they’ve had very different experiences, Kathryn Crowe and Hugh Brady share a common excitement for their work on SLS.
But if you think these two don’t have much common ground on which to build a strong working foundation, well, think again. Although the two aerospace engineers may be separated by a couple generations, they speak of each other with mutual admiration, respect ...

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