Home » News & Blogs » Pluto Flyby: Through the Eyes of an Early Career Scientist
Bookmark and Share
Pluto New Horizons Blog

Pluto Flyby: Through the Eyes of an Early Career Scientist

29 Jan 2016, 20:02 UTC
Pluto Flyby: Through the Eyes of an Early Career Scientist
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Today’s post is from Marcus Piquette, a third-year graduate student in the Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences Department at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Marcus is a part of the Particle and Plasmas Theme Team working on the Student Dust Counter aboard New Horizons.
Hello, I’m a Ph.D. student at the University of Colorado in Boulder; I recently took over as the lead graduate student for the Student Dust Counter (SDC) aboard New Horizons. SDC is an instrument that measures the distribution of dust in our solar system, providing information about the structure and evolution of bodies in the Kuiper Belt.
Being a fifth student generation to work on the instrument, I feel compelled to thank those who have come before me. Dozens of students spanning nearly 15 years came together to design, build, and now operate SDC—providing not only important scientific contributions, but also an unprecedented opportunity for young scientists and engineers to work on an interplanetary space mission. Their work has created a student legacy, led by the instrument’s principal investigator, Dr. Mihály Horányi, which exemplifies hard work and a team driven attitude, an attribute shared throughout the entire New Horizons mission.
Left to right: Marcus Piquette, New Horizons ...

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Advertise PTTU

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod