Home » News & Blogs » multiple transits
Bookmark and Share
Systemic - Characterizing Extrasolar Planetary Systems

multiple transits

26 Mar 2012, 00:57 UTC
multiple transits
(200 words excerpt, click title or image to see full post)

Enceladus, Dione, Titan, Mimas and Saturn. On Tuesday, Venus reaches its maximum elongation of 46 degrees from the Sun. Thereafter, its angular separation from the Sun steadily decreases until June 6th, when it undergoes transit. Transits of Venus are newsworthy because they are rare. Venus’ orbit is inclined by 3.4 degrees relative to the ecliptic, [...]

Enceladus, Dione, Titan, Mimas and Saturn.
On Tuesday, Venus reaches its maximum elongation of 46 degrees from the Sun. Thereafter, its angular separation from the Sun steadily decreases until June 6th, when it undergoes transit.

Transits of Venus are newsworthy because they are rare. Venus’ orbit is inclined by 3.4 degrees relative to the ecliptic, and so Earth must be near Venus’ nodal line if a transit is to be observed. The last one occurred in 2004, and the next one after June 6th will occur in December 2117. When talking transits-of-Venus in this day and age of astronomers flossing their “premium-platinum” frequent flyer status, it’s hard to resist that obligatory mention of Guillaume Le Gentil, whose unsuccessful expedition to observe the 1761 transit took 11 years, and had him returning to Paris in October 1771, only to find that he had been declared ...

Note: All formatting and links have been removed - click title or image to see full article.

Comment on this Post

* :
* :
:
* :
:
* required

Latest Vodcast

Latest Podcast

Most Popular Video

Advertise PTTU

Extrasolar Planets

  • Planetary Systems: 1145
  • Multiple Planet Systems: 469
  • Planets: 1832
more

NASA Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day

astronomy_pod