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The moon passes Jupiter, moves toward Pleiades a.m. July 25

24 Jul 2011, 08:01 UTC
The moon passes Jupiter, moves toward Pleiades a.m. July 25
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Before dawn tomorrow, the moon will pass near the Pleaides, a bright star cluster many observers associate with winter and spring, not summer.

Put your coffee pot on a timer and set your alarm for a couple of hours before sunrise tomorrow, because you’re going to want to get up early. In the dark eastern skies before dawn tomorrow, North Americans will see the waning crescent moon near the Pleiades star cluster, also known as the Seven Sisters. In Europe, Africa and Asia, you won’t see the moon quite as close to the Pleiades, but you’ll still see the moon somewhere between the Pleiades cluster and the blazing planet Jupiter.
If you aren’t familiar with the Pleiades, it will appear as a tiny starlit dipper. Most people see six or seven stars here, under good conditions. Depending on your eyesight and the local conditions, you may not even be able to see any stars in the Pleiades. Sometimes it just looks like a small glowing patch or cloud. Telescopically, there are hundreds of stars visible in the Pleiades cluster. Compared to our sun, these stars are all significantly younger, larger and hotter. They are all about 400 light years away, ...

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